30 Years of Democratic Transition in CEE: Unfinished Business? - Programme

20.09.201910:00 - 12:00

Library, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall

Set notification
20.09.201912:00 - 13:30

Library, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall

GLOBSEC International Advisory Board lunch

Upon separate invitation only

Set notification
20.09.201913:30 - 13:40

Library, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall)

Set notification
20.09.201913:40 - 15:00

Multi-functional room, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall

Panel I. Re-engagement in CEE: Civil Society 2.0

The 30 years of democratic change in Central Europe represent a tremendous success story for democracy and for the idea of Europe whole and free and at peace. Civil society has been one of the driving forces behind the transformation from a space defined by authoritarian occupation to one comprised of sovereign democracies. And U.S. foundations, importantly, played a crucial role in fostering the development of this robust civil society in the region. Following the accession of countries in the region to the EU and NATO, the mission was deemed accomplished. History, however, does not develop in a linear fashion.  

Emboldened authoritarian pressures coming from the outside and doubts from within stirred by incomplete economic and institutional transformation threaten to undo the region’s democratic achievements. Central Europe could become the first victim of a broader crisis of democracy, the growth of populism, and the rise of authoritarianism. Propelled by disinformation campaigns, anti-Americanism is growing and trust in Western institutions is decreasing to dangerously low levels. The need to bolster civil society and democratic forces in the region is stronger than ever, but to succeed, we need civil society 2.0 – an up-to-date version that is adjusted to and restructured in light of contemporary internal and external challenges. As before, it can only be done in cooperation with U.S. partners – institutions, foundations, public and private donors. How can we support civil society 2.0 in Central and Eastern Europe? How can we construct the Transatlantic coalition to withstand the backsliding of democracy? What is the best way for American actors and donors to re-engage in the region? 

Set notification
20.09.201915:00 - 15:20
Set notification
20.09.201915:20 - 16:40

Multi-functional room, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall)

Panel II. Economic Transformation of CEE and investment potential

Central Europe is the poster child of the astounding economic transformation brought about by a democratic and free market transition. The accession to the European Union and U.S. investments and business ventures in the region have accelerated economic growth, sparked innovation, and stimulated the development of an entrepreneurial culture. Full of young talent, the region has all the prerequisites to become the economic motor of Europe. The potential to expand business ties in industry, services, and digital and new tech domains is immense. If realized, these new relations will not only bring further economic growth to the U.S. and the region but also help ensure global economic and technological leadership of the Western world. How can we transform Central Europe into a Danube Valley region of innovation? How can a propitious environment be provided for trade to flourish? How can we channel investments into emerging technologies and support the deployment of these technologies to excel against Chinese competitors? 

Set notification
20.09.201916:40 - 17:00

Multi-functional room, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall

Set notification
20.09.201917:00 - 18:20

Multi-functional room, 3rd floor, Bohemian National Hall

Panel III. Stronger Together: Navigating a Disrupted World

Over the past 30 years, the U.S. and Central Europe have worked together to re-embed the region into the Westerndriven liberal democratic order that relies on the rule of law, multilateralism, and cooperative institutions. The world has been changing rapidly, however, and today we live in a very different place than 30 years ago. The global competition is intensifying, with great powers repeatedly finding themselves on the brink of trade wars. Technological progress has been changing the way we live and work at a pace that exceeds the ability of institutions to reap its benefits and neutralize potential challenges, including the abuse of technologies by illiberal powers. Growing in confidence, China is insidiously imposing its economic conditions and domination that spills over to the political realm. Europe has been focusing on Brexit, neglecting a wide array of other concerns. The faith in multilateralism is shaken. In this environment, navigating the disrupted world alone is a strategy that is unlikely to deliver success. The U.S. and Europe, with Central Europe being an integral part of it, need each other to withstand the global competition in every domain: economy, technology, values, and way of life. How can we revive the transatlantic partnership to sustain the rule-based order and prosper in an increasingly competitive world? What is the place of Central Europe in the US grand strategy? How can we join forces to sustain, or even regain, technological leadership? 

Set notification
20.09.201918:20 - 19:00

4th floor, Bohemian National Hall

Set notification
20.09.201919:00 - 21:30

Grand Ballroom, 4th floor, Bohemian National Hall

Set notification

Programmes